Luther College anthropologist Colin Betts near a 1940s era Oneota/Ioway archaeological site off Ice Cave Road in Decorah. (Submitted photo)<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->
Luther College anthropologist Colin Betts near a 1940s era Oneota/Ioway archaeological site off Ice Cave Road in Decorah. (Submitted photo)

Colin Betts, professor of anthropology at Luther College will be featured as a scholar in the documentary sequel project Lost Nation: The Ioway 2 and 3.

Kelly and Tammy Rundle of Fourth Wall Films, the Emmy-nominated producers of the historical documentaries Country School: One Room-One Nation; Villisca: Living with a Mystery and Lost Nation: The Ioway have turned their cameras once again on the tribe for which the state of Iowa is named.



Two new films

Through their fiscal sponsor Native Languages of the Americas, Inc., the documentary sequel project Lost Nation: The Ioway 2 and 3 was awarded a $9,679 grant from Humanities Iowa. The sequel will continue where Lost Nation: The Ioway left off, with two new films.



When the Ioway are forcibly removed from their ancestral homelands in 1838 to a reservation in Northeast Kansas, Ioway leader White Cloud (The Younger) believes his people must relocate to survive. But intermarriage, broken treaties and the end of communal living leads to a split in 1878 and the establishment of a second Ioway tribe in Oklahoma. Both tribes endure hardship and challenges to their traditions and culture to achieve successful land claims and self-determination in the 1970s. Lost Nation: The Iowa 2 and 3 brings the Ioway story full circle.



Telling the story

The Rundles began shooting Ioway 2 and 3 in the fall of 2010. The Humanities Iowa grant provided partial funding for filming Oneota archaeological sites in Winneshiek County and an interview with Betts. Betts will join Ioway tribal members and other American Indians, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists to tell the dramatic and true story of the small tribe that once claimed the territory between the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers from Pipestone, Minn. to St. Louis, Mo.



Lost Nation: The Ioway 2 and 3 will be released in December with public television broadcasts and a DVD release to follow. An alternative soundtrack in the nearly extinct Ioway language will be offered on the DVD.

In addition to Humanities Iowa, Lost Nation: The Ioway 2 and 3 has received grants from Silos and Smokestacks National Heritage Area, the Kansas Humanities Council, the Oklahoma Humanities Council, the Nebraska Humanities Council, the Wisconsin Humanities Council and the South Dakota Humanities Council.

Humanities Iowa is the only non-profit organization in Iowa committed to bringing the humanities to life and to the public through interactive programming, publications and events.



Native Languages of the Americas, Inc., located in St. Paul, Minn., is a non-profit organization dedicated to the survival of Native American Languages. Their website, native-languages.org, is a compendium of online materials related to several hundred indigenous languages of the western hemisphere.